Telehealth: Is It A Fitness or Medical Wearable?

Our healthcare delivery is a rising concern in the United States as it affects everyone: our aging parents, your obese uncle or diabetic sister and even you.

Think about it — We are all aging with varying degrees of wellness. Some of our bodies age more gracefully than others, but as our bodies’ function declines our concern for mobility and living a life of continued independence become a priority. 80% of the elderly population have 2 or more chronic diseases and these are expensive yet treatable diseases that can be managed. Preventing the development of chronic conditions in the elderly could be the only way to improve life expectancy; perhaps new developments in the wearable sensor industry can address some of these issues by monitoring behaviors that might lead to diseases before health deteriorates.

Fortunately, with the rise of mobile technology, growing networks (Cloud platforms), and new computer technologies (Apps) we are seeing the mainstreaming of telemetry used as wearables today. The rise of smartphones with technologies such as 3G and 4G networks will further promote the adoption of mobile devices in most sectors, but with the most benefit, in the healthcare delivery system. The rise of telemedicine to monitor and manage chronic conditions can help reduce geographic barriers, cost of travel and time (from in-hospital to home consultations) and has the potential to offer seamless support and care to patients according to AlliedMarketResearch.

 

Infographic: Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Plan to Buy Wearable Tech  | Statista

According to Statista, 1 out of 5 adults in the U.S. plan to buy a wearable tech this year.

At CES 2014 last year, Scott Stein of CNET differentiated wearables into three categories: Notifiers, Trackers and Glasses.

We see many products which define the quantified-self movement — that which track our steps, monitor our heart rate and displays/share with our social networks — but what distinguishes a wearable as a medical device? This topic was this month’s discussion at the Activity Sensor & Personal Analytics Meet-Up held at Audience in Mountain View, CA. Gene Leybzon led the discussion and stated that medical wearables purpose is for diagnosis and treatment — and must pass a labyrinthine of regulatory and legal processes such as FDA and HIPAA. A fitness wearable does not have to pass the stringent regulatory tests and only needs to be informational and educational to the user. This user saturated market in fitness wearables (i.e. FitBit heart heart monitor, Nike FuelBand, Garmin & Polar speed tracker/pedometer, Spree body temperature tracker) may not be used for diagnostic purposes, but may be extremely helpful as it leads the path for medical wearables .

A guest speaker from Proteus discussed the future release of an ingestible sensor that would integrate with medication allowing physicians to monitor compliance from a remote location. This is important for patients with diseases of the central nervous system (including multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s), heart failure and possibly organ transplant patients. This innovation would track sustained patient compliance and provide assurance that medications are being taken in a timely manner for presiding physicians or caregivers and family loved ones.

We also looked at a product called AliveCor, a heart rate monitor that detects atrial fibrillation.

 

 

[Click the ‘i’ icon on the top left corner of each photo to learn more.]
 

 

Tech Eye Wear for Fashion, Sport and Future Integration

Google Creating Scarcity:

Today (April 15; Tax Day!) a limited number of Google’s smart glasses will be available for purchase but only for U.S. residents. That’s right, only today you can buy these lovely stylish glasses for a mere $1,500. and you don’t have to be one of Google’s chosen few in their ‘Explorer Program‘.

Google Glass

Google Glass. Fashion + Function.

On a humorous note, nothing says elitism more than these White Men Wearing Google Glass  as a Tumblr response to all the early adopters and made it as 45 Best Tumblr 2013. You see, previous purchasers of the Google Glasses had to have been referred by friends to purchase the glasses, and they tended to be developers and social media influencers. Google is aware of it’s “Glasshole” reputation of users who are misusing or not displaying social etiquette and have come up with their own guideline. I personally enjoyed reading Scott Biddle of ValleyWag humorous ‘Do’s & Don’t’ list for Glass Explorers that helps us poor souls from becoming  alienating socialpaths!

 

Will Samsung Differentiate Into the Sports Market?

Samsung's Heads-up Display

Samsung’s Heads-up Display

 

More manufacturers are entering the wearable market which helps propel the quantified-self movement where all one’s personal self-tracking data is stored and displayed for analysis.  Samsung has entered the heads-up display eye wear market along with their smart watches. It wouldn’t be surprising if (soon) the Samsung watches had microsensors on the back to collect heart rate / pulse and have that data displayed  on their glasses & watches or any other mobile device.  These patent eyewear images are described as having ear pieces for listening to music, but may also display auditory alerts while  exercising (perfect for adopting use with exercise apps such as RunKeeper).

The Cardo BK-1 headset is an excellent product

The Cardo BK-1 headset is an excellent product

I love the idea of having an ear piece to assist with situational awareness. As a road cyclist I constantly worry about safety; communicating the hazards on the road while riding with others is a very important part of cycling. Cyclists have developed hand signals to demonstrate potholes on broken asphalt, road barriers, open car doors and other potential hazards but also when riding as a group we will alert riders behind us of our actions (if we are slowing or stopping). The Cardo BK-1 headset isn’t part of my eye wear, it attaches to my helmet, but I can understand the great value Google Glass and Samsung sport glasses would have if they integrate an intercom unit to their ear piece. It seems, at least for now, the above wearables are going after a different market, but I enjoy the interception between fashion, sport and utility of a product. The function of the product must be comfortable and practical, but also have a decent price point in order for me to get excited and for mass market appeal.

 

 

The Overview of Content Strategy: How Do I Add VALUE

Before I begin any project we have to think about the specific audience you wish to appeal to and what value will this new information bring. I ask these questions to my clients because your customers are being bombarded by online messages constantly (though email, snail mail, television, social media platforms) and if the content is not useful, or is not relevant to their current needs then your message will be lost or even ignored.

When creating content marketing strategy consider the following:

  1. Who is your target audience? What position are the decision makers? Is it B2B or B2C?
  2. What do your customers/audience want? What are their needs in the near future?
  3. What are their goals?
  4. How can we help them? What information can we share to help them come up with a solution.

Once we answer these preliminary questions we can figure out how to add value to their business and focus the best medium to use. Many corporate companies have been using white papers and case studies as examples for their customers on their websites, but the growth of on demand video and mobile video views have been increasing and social platform viewing of videos (such as on Facebook pages) and YouTube channels have been giving SEO boosts to company websites. The strength of storytelling using video not only establishes the customer as a thought leader but it helps convey several intangible things such as the company culture, the attitude of the company crew & executives, and values. People skills will add warmth and familiarity to any potential customer or buyer of a product and service. When people buy a product, they buy a brand, a culture, a lifestyle and it’s that promise that you are offering to them that will be conveyed in video.

Here’s an example of a project which we created to help educate our customers about the installation process while also demonstrating who our customers are.

 

Maritime Leaders in the Pacific Northwest: Predictions for 2014

Boat-600x315

I recently interviewed a few of the maritime leaders for Krill Systems asking their thoughts and predictions for the upcoming year (2014). We were able to interview David Moseley, Director of the Washington State Ferries, Ralph Duncan, VP Business Development for BMT Designers & Planners, Matt Nichols, CEO Nichols Bros. Boat Builders, Art Parker, Sales Manager for Kvichak Marine Industries, Trevor Machen of Radar Marine, and Grant Fosheim for Vigor Industries.

This video was also redistributed by Maritime Executive Magazine’s Facebook page, their twitter feed and Maritime Executive website (our shared demographic audience). It pays to create sharable content because even if the viewers aren’t clicking through to your website from the video it’s still impressions and our company name giving brand visibility, everyone wins.

Maritime Ex website demographics

Maritime Ex website demographics

 

 

Leaders in the Maritime Industry

Gael-TarletonAndrew-Bennett

This is a short video I created for my class, Leadership in the Digital Age: Establishing Authenticity through Story (Crofts). “Leadership skills are not just traits you are born with, but competencies you learn and refine throughout your life. Today, with office structures flattening and transparency at a premium, authentic leadership is critical for success in the digital age.”

In this video I interviewed two leaders in the maritime industry and ask how they’ve overcome fear of risk taking, self-doubt & how to avoid burnout.